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Tuesday, 27 September 2011

Online forgiveness... via Twitter

Some random jottings as I just noticed that #sorryjesus is trending on twitter. If you look at the hashtag there are hundreds of people apologising for things they have done (or not done as the case may be) most of them for not spending more time with Him in the first place.  Isn't it funny that something like this starts and we all join in happily. Happily speaking out our woes and worries to Jesus. That is, by typing them in 140 characters...

My first reaction was one of irritation thinking, for goodness sake does it take a Twitter hashtag to get you all asking for forgiveness? You could just do that anyway, in the privacy of your own head. But then, why are people responding to this topic? Is it part of our current culture of 'living our lives in public': twitter/facebook/myspace and so on? Or is actually a valid appraoch to God? I am actually being serious BTW. If the church needs more relevance in todays society, isn't using social media a perfect way forward? And if God is always relevant, and as relevant today as he was 2000 years ago, then wouldn't He be using facebook and twitter to reach people? Not that I am suggesting God started the trend obvs...;)

If these people are writing these tweets with meaning, will God forgive them? I mean He is omnipresent, so surely he can access Twitter, right?

For some, especially the younger generation, the digital age is encompassing their whole lives, so why not faith too? reminds me of that scene in Bruce Almighty where the prayers come in, in email form and there are millions of them...

It does rather seem a bit false though - I mean really, if you only approach God because you saw it on Twitter then its hardly at the forefront of your mind is it? Shouldn't we be appraoching God in a more serious way, like we really mean it? I don't know, maybe some of these people really do mean it and it's just a comfortable, easy way for them to pray...

1 comment:

Pausingplace said...

The thing is, for every hundred people who say it glibly, perhaps one catches a glimpse of something deeper. That's good enough for me.

And anyhow, I think that we all manage to *say* things in prayer which we don'tperhaps really mean from time to time. But articulating it in the first place might move us of itself, mightn't it?